What’s in my handbag? Fabulous Flappers and 1920s Handbags.

The enduring image of the 1920s t is that of a young, thin, glamourous and often wealthy young woman with bobbed hair, short skirts and red lipstick. Think Clara Bow or Louise Brooks. This glamourous flapper-girl was far from the reality for most women of this period but it didn’t mean that a shop-girl didn’t get her hair bobbed or dream about her next dress. This was the age of growing consumerism and mass-production and the average woman could have a hat, dress or hand-bag just like Louise Brooks. Let’s take a look at what would be in this woman’s hand-bag in the 1920s! A sort of 21st century social media ‘What’s in my bag?’ post but with a 1920s twist!

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‘I took three buses to volunteer!’ – Perseverance and Persistence whilst working in history and heritage.

‘I took three buses to volunteer!’ is the true story of how during one volunteer placement I had to take three buses to arrive at my work place in time.This blog post concentrates on the need for perseverance, persistence and sheer old-fashioned hard work if you want to weather the storm of the precarious nature of museum work. Short contracts, low pay, little or no job security and the coveted ‘permanent job’ that might not be yours for many years to come if you don’t work hard and push yourself in the busy world that is a career in history and heritage.

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Twitter and Instagram: Historians in the Digital Age

Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Pinterest etc. ever thought of these digital social media platforms as a method of research or public engagement as an historian or museum professional? More and more people in 2019 have social media profiles that highlight their work to a wider, often global audience in a way that people twenty years ago could only dream off. I have and do use Twitter (and soon Instagram) daily to interact with historians across the world and to catch-up on the latest historical research and news whilst also promoting myself as an historian, blogger and curator.

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Saturday Supplement

A quick round-up of exciting exhibitions, cultural happenings, books and articles I’ve read, amazing food that I’ve eaten and everything else cultural, museums, history and heritage!

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The Stitches That Made It To The Moon

Today marks the 50th anniversary of Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin’s historic Apollo 11 mission to the moon. When Armstrong and Aldrin landed on the moon, they were wearing state of the art space suits designed by Playtex. Playtex as in the company that pioneered the use of latex in women’s undergarments including girdles and long-line bras. The spacesuits where designed by Playtex and where stitched by female seamstresses who already worked for the company such as Hazel Fellows, Anna Lee Minner, Lillie Elliott and Ruth Anna Ratledge. There is even a somewhat hilarious video of a man wearing an early version of one of the space suits to test out the limitations of the suit itself.

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